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NILI work and collaborations in the News

 

NW Indian Language Institute grant will aid online courses

When the Northwest Indian Language Institute at UO was faced with cancelling its 22nd annual training for indigenous language teachers due to COVID-19, organizers knew that couldn’t happen. But the institute had to find a way to continue language revitalization safely – and to fund its work.
-Anna Glavash, Around the O

NILI Youth


Student Creates Smartphone Keyboard To Save Endangered Language

There are only a few dozen living speakers of the Yakama dialect of the indigenous language Ichishkíin. Keegan Livermore wants to change that.
-OPB, Think Out Loud Podcast

Smart Phone App


Members of the UO community honored at annual MLK Awards

More than 300 people from across campus and the community attended the Martin Luther King, Jr. awards ceremony and luncheon to honor King’s legacy and campus members who embrace King’s ideals.
-Around the O

MLK Award

 


UO Takes Steps Towards Revitalizing Native Languages

The University of Oregon is making big steps towards revitalizing native languages which are quickly disappearing across the nation. It’s all part of a rare partnership between the University’s Northwest Indian Language Institute and the Federal Administration for Native Americans.
-Kelsey Christianson, KVAL

KVAL NILI


Linguists and Native Americans Team Up on Indigenous Languages 

“Today, Native social scientists are actively engaged in the revitalization of their cultures and languages. At the University of Oregon, teams of Native researchers are building digital archives containing historical documentation to make language knowledge available to their communities.”
-Matt Cooper, Around the O

Enna Helms and Gabriela Perez-Baez

 


Women of Running Strong for American Indian Youth®: Cheryl Tuttle 

“I think that the language is the mind of the people. Inside of the language, even in the way things are spoken about, you know how people thought. How the ancestors thought about things, what was important to them. Their world view is wrapped up in language”
-Dreamstarter mentor and Wailaki Language teacher Cheryl Tuttle

Cheryl Tuttle

 

 

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